You Can’t Tell the Players Without a Scorecard!

The old baseball phrase is especially true if your name is Henry Chew Gaither! There are more mix-ups about the Gaither men in the family who carry this name than most other names.

We’ve recently read about the first Henry Chew Gaither (1751-1811) in articles by Nancy Jones. This Henry Chew Gaither was the son of Henry Gaither (1724-1783) & Martha Ridgely Gaither. Right away there are historical mix-ups between father Henry and son Henry Chew Gaither. Henry Chew Gaither (HCG) was the first to carry the maiden name of Henry, Sr.’s grandmother Sarah Chew, spouse of Benjamin Gaither. The Chews were an influential family in Maryland history. Continue reading

A “Chance” Encounter with “Gaither’s Chance”

Imagine my recent excitement when, while ‘playing’ on Google maps, a Coldwell Banker pop-up screen revealed a home sale listing for “Gaither’s Chance,” Clarksville, Maryland! Kismet! Needless to say, by the next morning my ever-helpful, very supportive hubby Mike was driving us there.

GaitherChanceFrontThis Gaither homestead was unknown to me. It is not the “Gaither’s Chance” of Prince George’s, now Montgomery County, Maryland, which was home of early Gaithers in the Benjamin line. Rather, the original 1747 patentee was billed as Samuel Gaither of Anne Arundel County, now Howard County, Maryland. WOW!!! Could it be that a Gaither home from 1747, unknown to me and in my home state was still standing? It was. It is. But, unfortunately, maybe not for long - - but, more on that later. Continue reading

Did you know . . . you can get lots of Gaither documents on the Maryland State Archives website?

The Maryland State Archives in Annapolis, Maryland has a treasure trove of historical documents on the Gaither family. Fortunately for genealogists, Maryland claims to have digitized more documents than any other state, and many gems on the Gaither family can be found on line.

Maryland’s State Archives’ Internet address is www.msa.maryland.gov, and the homepage provides an overview of its contents. Two particular sites that are especially helpful for conducting research are: 1) Archives of Maryland Online www.aomol.msa.maryland.gov, which contains a variety of records, including probate, judicial, and military records; and, 2) www.mdlandrec.net, which contains digitized land deeds back to the 1600s.

You won’t be disappointed in what you’ll find on these sites.  To whet your appetite check out Volume 10, pages 194-195 (beginning at the bottom of p. 194). It is the record, often referenced, in which: “Letters of administration were issued to widow Mary on John Geather’s estate, 24 November 1652.” As a researcher, it’s exciting to have the source of that oft-quoted synopsis, and to read the entire court entry, which is as follows:

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Did you know . . . about the huge discovery at John Gater’s first American home, Jamestown?

If you haven’t heard, there’s been a huge discovery at the ongoing archaeological dig at Jamestown Fort! The Jamestown Rediscovery Team, in conjunction with the Smithsonian Institution, has identified the names of the four men buried within the Chancel of the 1608-1617 original Church. All four were leaders in the earliest years of the Colony: Reverend Robert Hunt, Captain Gabriel Archer, Sir Ferdinando Wainman, and Captain William West. Continue reading

Did you know . . . a Gaither once owned the home of a signer of the Declaration of Independence . . .

Did you know that a Gaither once owned the home of a signer of the Declaration of Independence? According to accounts prepared by the Maryland Inventory of Historic Properties, "Thomas H. and Sophia B. Gaither of Howard County, Maryland, purchased the house at 207 Hanover Street , Annapolis, Maryland in 1896, which was once owned by Maryland Signer of the Declaration of Independence Thomas Stone. A veteran of the Civil War, Thomas, and wife Sophia, purchased the house as a wedding gift for their daughter, Georgiana, who married 'Collector of the Port" James Lawrence Bailliere. The 1900 Census lists Mr. & Mrs. Bailliere and two sons as living there. With the death of Bailliere in 1917, Georgiana moved to Baltimore to be near her family."

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Did you know . . . two Gaither homesteads are listed on the National Register of Historic Places . . .

Did you know that at least two Maryland homesteads settled by Gaithers are on the National Register of Historic places? “Abington” was patented 365 years ago, in 1649, by John Gaither and Robert Proctor after arriving in Maryland, from Virginia. It is located in Anne Arundel County and was listed on the National Register in 1984.

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Did you know . . . two Gaither homesteads are listed on the National Register of Historic Places . . .

Did you know that at least two Maryland homesteads settled by Gaithers are on the National Register of Historic places? “Abington” was patented 365 years ago, in 1649, by John Gaither and Robert Proctor after arriving in Maryland, from Virginia. It is located in Anne Arundel County and was listed on the National Register in 1984.

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Did you know . . . about the entrepreneurship of James H. Gaither?

James H. Gaither, an early entrepreneur in the express package delivery business, when horses and wagons provided all of the "express", was also the owner and operator of one of the largest livery stables in the Baltimore area. Today's “Did You Know . . .” story was submitted by Nancy E. Gaither of Elkridge, Maryland, the great-great-granddaughter of James H. Gaither.  Thank you Nancy for sharing. You can read the entire story, which appeared in the Catonsville Patch by clicking here. Be sure to look for the pictures of James Gaither at the top of the story.

If you have more information on this topic, please comment by clicking on the “Leave a reply” or “Reply” button below. If you have a “Did You Know . . .” story you would like to share, click here and complete the entry form.

Did you know . . . Gaither Relative was Caddy for Jack Nicklaus?

Jack Rickard, now 84, told GolfWeek recently how he caddied 40 years ago for Jack Nicklaus in the 1974 PGA Championship at Tanglewood Park in Clemmons, N.C. Rickard is the son of Hattie Gaither Rickard, the grandson of William Henry Gaither, and in the line of Elijah and Zachariah Gaither. In addition to the honor, Rickard ended up with a front row seat to a Sunday showdown between Lee Trevino and Nicklaus. You can read the rest of the story in Golf Week by clicking here.  

Today's “Did You Know . . .” story was submitted by SJGD Director Jo Ann Bondurant of Greenboro, North Carolina. Jo Ann says of her cousin, "Jack is 84 and still dancing and golfing...looks about 65! He is one of my favorite cousins."

If you have more information on this topic, please comment by clicking on the “Leave a reply” or “Reply” button below. If you have a “Did You Know . . .” story you would like to share, click here and give us the details..

Did you know . . . that 294 years ago at All Hallows Church . . .

Did you know that 294 years ago, on July 10, 1720, three Gaither families gathered at All Hallows Church in Anne Arundel County, Maryland and together, baptized their newest born? The All Hallows Church Records reveal the following:

10 July 1720 were baptized: Amos son of John Gaither and wife Elizabeth; Rachel, daughter of Samuel White and wife Rachel (Gaither); and, Ruth, daughter of Richard Stimson and wife Rebekah (Gaither).

Just imagine our ancestors gathering around that baptistery almost 300 years ago! It’s a thrilling vision and wonderful to discover that “the ties that bind” were strong among those family members of so very long ago.

All Hallows was the Gaither’s first church in Maryland, with informative records of births, deaths and marriages. In recognition of its significance in our ancestors’ lives, our Society donated a lamppost in memory of John Gaither, who died in 1702. Today, that lamppost still greets churchgoers on the front walk of All Hallows Church.

If you have more information on this topic, please comment by clicking on the "Leave a reply" or "Reply" button below.  If you have a "Did You Know . . ." story you would like to share, click here and complete the entry form.