Researching Gaithers in Georgia?

For those of you interested in researching Gaithers in Georgia, The Georgia Historic Newspapers Archive is a great site with a lot to offer. The newspapers are digitized and fully searchable.

The Georgia Historic Newspapers Archive is a project of the Digital Library of Georgia (DLG), a part of Georgia’s Virtual Library GALILEO and is based at the University of Georgia Libraries. The archive is free and open for public use and includes over one million Georgia newspaper pages between 1786 and 1986.

The following are a few examples of what you can find.

From the Southern Recorder. (Milledgeville, Ga.) 1820-1872, February 17, 1846

WILL BE SOLD, on the first Tuesday in March next, in the town of Eatonton, 400 acres ofl and, more or less—being the place whereon the late Mrs. Elizabeth  Gaither resided,on a credit of one,two, three and four years. Notes, with undoubted security, will be required.Sold in pursuance of the last will and testament of
Brice Gaither, deceased, for the benefit of their heirs.
GREENBURY GAITHER, HENRY GAITHER  Executors

WILL BE SOLD, on the 26th of February next at the late residence of Mrs. Elizabeth Gaither,near Eatonton. about a hundred barrels of corn, together with Fodder, Oats, Bacon, Lard, Horses,Mules, Cattle, Hogs, Sheep, a close Carriage, Barouche,
Wagon, household and kitchen furniture, and a variety of other articles belonging to
the estate of Brice Gaither, deceased. Terms on the day of sale. Sale to continue from day to day until all is sold.
GREENBURY GAITHER, HENRY GAITHER, Executors
Jan. 20, 1845

From the The Dublin post. (Dublin, Ga.) 1878-1894, April 09, 1879

The length of a pig's tail led to a murder in Madison county, N. C.,
last. Thursday. Two farmers, named Norton and Gaither, disputed concerning
the length of the tail of a pig which they were examining.
Norton gave Gaither the lie, whereupon Gaither told Norton to get
ready for a deadly fight, Both men drew their revolvers almost simultaneously.
Gaither was fatally wounded and Norton lost a thumb. The
point as to which of the two men was right in regard to the length of
the pig's tail remains undecided.

The Georgia Journal. (Milledgeville, Ga.) 1809-1847, July 14, 1835,

DIED—In Newton county, on the night of the 25th . Greenbury, youngest child of Dr. Henry and Mrs. Sarah Gaither, aged 13 months and 9 days: Parental affection could not but weep, when the 'tendered of human ties was rending. But the struggle is over—the
infant is gone,and the voice of its Redeemer, crying, "Suffer little children to come unto me forbid them not, for of such is the kingdom of Heaven," inspires confidence,
and peace, and heavenly resiguation.

Go to the following website to begin your search. https://gahistoricnewspapers.galileo.usg.edu

Happy Hunting

 

Why Annapolis, Maryland?

With our upcoming Reunion taking place in Annapolis, Maryland, you may ask yourself - - why was it that John Gaither relocated to Maryland from his Virginia homestead? What could possibly have forced him out of that valuable holding, which he settled as virgin land, and had held for 14 years? Was it a natural disaster, need for better land, adventure? The answer is a broken promise of freedom.

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Abington – The Gaither Family Seat Since 1649

At our June 2018 Reunion in Annapolis, Maryland, a highlight of our activities will be visiting "Abington", the Gaither family seat beginning in 1649 - - 369 years ago!

John Gaither and Robert Proctor were the original patentees of the 875 acres of what they named "Abington". Its size and Gaither family ownership has waxed and waned over the succeeding centuries. While I have not yet completed my research into the chain of title for the property, as late as 1855, a Thomas and Rebecca Gaither sell 46-1/2 acres of Abington, which were conveyed to them by Rezin and Sarah R. Gaither in 1853. Gaithers, by far, have enjoyed the longest period of ownership at over 200 years!

Today, Abington is a horse farm in private hands, with a fraction of the original acreage remaining under that name. In 1975, it was accepted into the National Register of Historic Places. The land's wonderful fundamentals, which surely motivated John Gaither's astute selection, are still apparent.

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You Can’t Tell the Players Without a Scorecard!

The old baseball phrase is especially true if your name is Henry Chew Gaither! There are more mix-ups about the Gaither men in the family who carry this name than most other names.

We’ve recently read about the first Henry Chew Gaither (1751-1811) in articles by Nancy Jones. This Henry Chew Gaither was the son of Henry Gaither (1724-1783) & Martha Ridgely Gaither. Right away there are historical mix-ups between father Henry and son Henry Chew Gaither. Henry Chew Gaither (HCG) was the first to carry the maiden name of Henry, Sr.’s grandmother Sarah Chew, spouse of Benjamin Gaither. The Chews were an influential family in Maryland history. Continue reading

A “Chance” Encounter with “Gaither’s Chance”

Imagine my recent excitement when, while ‘playing’ on Google maps, a Coldwell Banker pop-up screen revealed a home sale listing for “Gaither’s Chance,” Clarksville, Maryland! Kismet! Needless to say, by the next morning my ever-helpful, very supportive hubby Mike was driving us there.

GaitherChanceFrontThis Gaither homestead was unknown to me. It is not the “Gaither’s Chance” of Prince George’s, now Montgomery County, Maryland, which was home of early Gaithers in the Benjamin line. Rather, the original 1747 patentee was billed as Samuel Gaither of Anne Arundel County, now Howard County, Maryland. WOW!!! Could it be that a Gaither home from 1747, unknown to me and in my home state was still standing? It was. It is. But, unfortunately, maybe not for long - - but, more on that later. Continue reading

Did you know . . . you can get lots of Gaither documents on the Maryland State Archives website?

The Maryland State Archives in Annapolis, Maryland has a treasure trove of historical documents on the Gaither family. Fortunately for genealogists, Maryland claims to have digitized more documents than any other state, and many gems on the Gaither family can be found on line.

Maryland’s State Archives’ Internet address is www.msa.maryland.gov, and the homepage provides an overview of its contents. Two particular sites that are especially helpful for conducting research are: 1) Archives of Maryland Online www.aomol.msa.maryland.gov, which contains a variety of records, including probate, judicial, and military records; and, 2) www.mdlandrec.net, which contains digitized land deeds back to the 1600s.

You won’t be disappointed in what you’ll find on these sites.  To whet your appetite check out Volume 10, pages 194-195 (beginning at the bottom of p. 194). It is the record, often referenced, in which: “Letters of administration were issued to widow Mary on John Geather’s estate, 24 November 1652.” As a researcher, it’s exciting to have the source of that oft-quoted synopsis, and to read the entire court entry, which is as follows:

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Did you know . . . about the huge discovery at John Gater’s first American home, Jamestown?

If you haven’t heard, there’s been a huge discovery at the ongoing archaeological dig at Jamestown Fort! The Jamestown Rediscovery Team, in conjunction with the Smithsonian Institution, has identified the names of the four men buried within the Chancel of the 1608-1617 original Church. All four were leaders in the earliest years of the Colony: Reverend Robert Hunt, Captain Gabriel Archer, Sir Ferdinando Wainman, and Captain William West. Continue reading

Did you know . . . a Gaither once owned the home of a signer of the Declaration of Independence . . .

Did you know that a Gaither once owned the home of a signer of the Declaration of Independence? According to accounts prepared by the Maryland Inventory of Historic Properties, "Thomas H. and Sophia B. Gaither of Howard County, Maryland, purchased the house at 207 Hanover Street , Annapolis, Maryland in 1896, which was once owned by Maryland Signer of the Declaration of Independence Thomas Stone. A veteran of the Civil War, Thomas, and wife Sophia, purchased the house as a wedding gift for their daughter, Georgiana, who married 'Collector of the Port" James Lawrence Bailliere. The 1900 Census lists Mr. & Mrs. Bailliere and two sons as living there. With the death of Bailliere in 1917, Georgiana moved to Baltimore to be near her family."

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Did you know . . . two Gaither homesteads are listed on the National Register of Historic Places . . .

Did you know that at least two Maryland homesteads settled by Gaithers are on the National Register of Historic places? “Abington” was patented 365 years ago, in 1649, by John Gaither and Robert Proctor after arriving in Maryland, from Virginia. It is located in Anne Arundel County and was listed on the National Register in 1984.

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Did you know . . . two Gaither homesteads are listed on the National Register of Historic Places . . .

Did you know that at least two Maryland homesteads settled by Gaithers are on the National Register of Historic places? “Abington” was patented 365 years ago, in 1649, by John Gaither and Robert Proctor after arriving in Maryland, from Virginia. It is located in Anne Arundel County and was listed on the National Register in 1984.

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